Snowplowing

snowplowing

It’s that time of year. 

Plows are breaking out in every community.  Our phone rings and our client on the other end has questions about plowing and plates or plowing and insurance or both.

Here’s the skinny: Massachusetts law is clear on the point that if you plow for hire, you need Commercial plates.

Personal passenger plates are acceptable only if you plow your own driveway, or if say you plow a relatives driveway but do not get paid.  Even still, a police office might write a ticket to a vehicle plowing with Private passenger plates- such a ticket would need to be appealed.

Insurance and plowing is a little more complicated.

Insurance carriers have different appetites for vehicles used for plowing.  We work with some that will not write plows of any kind, others that will write only vehicles used for residential plowing and others that allow plowing without restriction.

Please call if you plow and we can review your specific situation to ensure you have the right coverage and plates.

Happy Thanksgiving

Johnson and Rohan Insurance Happy Thanksgiving

Johnson & Rohan Insurance is thankful for having you as a client.

We understand there are many places to buy your insurance.

Our goal, is to provide added value to our clients.

Everyday we ask ourselves: “where do we add value?”

Value is saving you money and maximizing different companies’ discount programs.

Value is at claim time when you understand the coverage you’ve spent all this money on over the years.

Value is when you call our office and get a friendly & responsive voice.

Value is having an independent, insurance professional reviewing your coverage, shopping your insurance, and offering trusted advice at claim time.

Johnson & Rohan Insurance appreciates your business.

Thank you for insuring with us.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Homeowner Renewal Checklist

Homeowner Renewal Checklist

We recommend you review and call us with any “yes” answers.

  • Do you own jewelry, furs or watches with values over $1,000?
  • Do you own silverware with a total value of over $2,500?
  • Do you have a collection of valuables, including: coins, stamps or other?
  • Do you own any of the following: Musical Instruments, Fine Arts or Antiques, Camera Equipment, Sports Equipment, Personal Computer?
  • Do you own a boat?
  • Is there a trampoline on your property?
  • Do you have any tools, equipment or other property used in your business or occupation?
  • Would you like your insurance to provide: Replacement Cost Protection on your Dwelling, on your Personal Property, Credit Card/forgery protection, Ordinance or Law coverage, Earthquake coverage?
  • Flood is not a covered loss on a homeowner policy. Would you like to obtain rates for flood insurance? Also excluded from coverage are such things such as: rot, mold, mildew or animal/vermin/insect damage.
  • Are you interested in receiving information on:  Auto, Life, Excess Liability (Umbrella), Boat or Business Insurance?

Please call us with any questions about your apartment, condominium, or home insurance protection.

Thank you for insuring with Johnson & Rohan.

Johnson & Rohan’s Top 10 Fall Day Trips

If you live in Boston or are visiting the city in the fall, here are Johnson & Rohan’s Top 10 Fall Day Trips!

# 10  Russell Orchards, Ipswich

Image result for kids apple picking

Apple picking can begin as early as late August and last through October, but it all depends on the weather, the crop yield, and the amount of pickers who come. With ten varieties of pick-your-own apples that open and close as they ripen and then get picked out. Check out their website for the varieties currently available and go have some family fun!

#9  Plymouth Plantation Living Museum Day Trip From Boston

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Book via Viator.com and a motorcoach will take you out of Boston for an eight-hour pilgrimage to Plymouth, Massachusetts, the historic home of the Pilgrims. You’ll be on your own to explore Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth’s waterfront, Plymouth Rock, Mayflower II and other historic sites. Monday, Wednesday and Friday departures are available through late October. 

#8  Spooktacular Salem

 

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Salem, Massachusetts, is just 25 miles north of Boston, and the spooky city where the Salem Witch Trials took place in 1692 is easily accessible via car or MBTA trains, or book a spot on a Salem-bound bus tour direct via Viator. October is a particularly good time to visit Salem–in addition to the town’s normal host of bewitching attractions, you’ll find a full calendar of Haunted Happenings.

#7 America’s Stonehenge

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You’ve probably heard of Stonehenge–that mysterious collection of megaliths (big rocks) over in the old England. But did you know that New England has its own Stonehenge in Salem, New Hampshire, just a 40-minute drive from Boston? Fall is the perfect season for a day trip to this mysterious attraction.

#6  Walden Pond

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Walden Pond covers 62 acres, but it’s really much larger than that. Few bodies of water have celebrity status to rival that of this serene pool in Concord, Massachusetts. 19th-century writer Henry David Thoreau is, of course, responsible for turning the pretty pond into an icon. See photos and learn how you can visit this scenic spot in the fall. It’s just a 35-minute car trip from Boston in Concord, Massachusetts.

#5   Davis’ Mega Maze

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New England’s oldest and largest cornfield maze is the 8-acre Mega Maze at Davis’ Farmland in Sterling, Massachusetts. Leave Boston behind for a scenic hour and 10-minute drive to this challenging, larger than life puzzle, where you can “get lost” for a while this fall and have loads of fun in the process.

#4  Old Sturbridge Village

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Old Sturbridge Village is a 200-acre time machine that transports visitors to the early 1800s. Within moments of setting foot inside the complex of historic buildings populated with authentically costumed “interpreters,” you can’t help but feel immersed in yesteryear. Old Sturbridge Village is the Northeast’s largest living history museum, a place where the routines and rituals of a 19th-century New England community play out day after day, season after season. Autumn is harvest season at Old Sturbridge Village, a fascinating and picturesque time for a visit. It’s an easy day trip destination from Boston, located just over an hour’s drive from the city.

#3   Castle in the Clouds

 

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Just over a two-hour drive from Boston in Moultonborough, New Hampshire, you’ll be stunned by the fall views from Castle in the Clouds, the spectacular, 5,500-acre estate built by eccentric industrialist Thomas Plant in 1914. Pause and hike to a waterfall on your drive up to this mountaintop abode, and, after your castle tour, linger over lunch or snacks and drinks at the Castle Cafe in the Carriage House.

#2  The Head of the Charles Regatta

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With more than 55 exciting events involving almost 2,000 boats over the 2-day period, there’s plenty to watch. With over 300,000 visitors expected, this is one of Boston’s most popular events. Otherwise, it’s simply a perfect excuse to be outside enjoying the October weather. The 3-mile race starts at Boston University’s DeWolfe Boathouse near the BU bridge and finishes just past the Eliot Bridge by the Artesani Playground in Brighton.

#1  The Topsfield Fair

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In the fall of 1818 there were 20 United States.  That September the Topsfield Fair first opened its doors to the public.  The tradition lives on with America’s Oldest Fair.  Held this year from September 29th– October 7th, enjoy craft fairs, swine races, The Village People, rides, arcade games, cotton candy and more.  I grew up waiting for the Fair like it was Christmas. Bring your kids and their friends!

Check your Inspection Sticker

check your inspection sticker

Perhaps the cruelest of all surcharge points on the personal MA Auto Insurance Policy is the one for an ”expired inspection sticker” citation.

Remember: Check your inspection sticker

In Massachusetts, a ticket for an expired vehicle inspection sticker is the equivalent, in auto insurance citation points, of a moving violation.

According to the MA Department of Insurance:

Surcharge points are incurred if you:

  • cause an at-fault accident
  • are convicted of or pay a fine for a traffic law violation
  • are assigned to an alcohol education program

An expired inspection sticker is considered “pay(ing) a fine for a traffic law violation.”

A $40 ticket results increased insurance costs for 6 years! About 20% increase the first three years, diminshing the following three .

Check your MA Inspection Sticker:  Don’t let it lapse!

Following please find a helpful, Mass Inspection Station locator link:

http://massvehiclecheck.state.ma.us/find_emissions_repair.php

The Lemon Law

The Lemon Law

Massachusetts Lemon Aid Law AKA: The Lemon Law

The Massachusetts Lemon Aid Law (Lemon Law) allows you to void or cancel a motor vehicle contract or sale if your vehicle fails to pass inspection within seven days from the date of sale AND if the estimated costs of repairs of emissions or safety related defects exceed 10% of the purchase price. ( M.G.L. c. 90 §7N) This law applies to both dealer and private party sales of cars and motorcycles purchased for personal or family use. Dealers must display your Lemon Aid rights by putting a sticker on the left front window of each used car at the time of delivery.

Vehicle Inspection And Registration Requirements

By law, sellers of used vehicles must remove inspection stickers prior to transferring the vehicle to the new owner. Motor vehicle inspection stickers are not transferable to a new owner. When you buy a used car, you must bring the car to a licensed Massachusetts Inspection Station within seven days of registering it. In order to be protected by the Lemon Aid Law, however, you will need to have it inspected within seven days of purchase. For your own protection, do not allow the dealer to do the inspection for you.

If Your Car Will Not Run

Cars that do not run automatically fail inspection. To be eligible for a refund under the Lemon Aid Law, you must demonstrate that the estimated cost of repairs for safety or emissions related defects (and not the problem that is keeping the car from being inspected) is more than 10% of purchase price. Proving this may be difficult because it requires that a mechanic locate the problems and estimate the cost of repairs for these defects.

How To Receive Your Refund

In order to obtain a refund, the vehicle must be inspected and rejected by a licensed Massachusetts Inspection Station within 7 days of purchasing it. The rejection cannot be caused by your negligence, abuse or an accident occurring after the date of sale. In addition, you must complete all of the following steps within 14 days from the date of sale:

  1. Get a written statement, signed by an authorized agent of the inspection station, stating the reasons why the vehicle failed to pass the safety or combined safety and emissions inspection test.
  2. Obtain a written estimate of the costs of the necessary emissions or safety repairs showing that those costs exceed 10% of the purchase price.
  3. Notify the seller of your intention to void the contract under this statute ( M.G.L. c. 90, §7N). Do this by certified mail, return receipt requested, and by regular mail. Enclose a copy of the documents listed in Steps 1 and 2. Be sure to save copies for your files.
  4. Deliver the car to the seller, even if delivery requires towing services. It is advisable to take a witness with you and copies of the documents listed in Steps 1, 2, and 3. If the seller refuses to accept the car, prepare a statement indicating that you and a witness delivered the car to the seller on that date, but that the seller refused to accept the car. Be sure the statement is signed by both you and your witness in the presence of a notary public.

If you comply with these provisions, you are entitled to a full refund of the purchase price. You and the seller may agree in writing to have the seller do the necessary emissions or safety-related repairs at the seller’s expense. You may, however, refuse the seller’s offer and accept a full refund.

If You Paid For a Title

Contact the Registry of Motor Vehicles Title Division at (617) 351-9550. Explain that you are returning the vehicle to the seller under the Lemon Aid Law, and that you are requesting that a certificate of title be issued to you as soon as possible. When you receive the title, you should assign and transfer it back to the seller. If the seller refuses to accept the title, then send it by certified mail and retain a copy for your records.

If You Paid Sales Tax and Registration Fees

Take the following steps immediately to ensure you receive a rebate:

Sales Tax: Fill out an abatement form available from the Massachusetts Department of Revenue Taxpayer Service Division, P.O. Box 7010, Boston, MA 02204, (617) 887-6367.

Registration Fee: If you return your license plates within 10 days from the date you registered your car, you will receive a refund less a charge of $5. If you return your plates after this 10-day period, but within a “reasonable time,” you will receive a partial rebate.

Asserting Your Rights

If you followed all of the above steps and the seller does not refund your money, you should explore the following options:

Mediation:
Mediation is an inexpensive and informal way to resolve your dispute without hiring an attorney and going to court. Contact the Attorney General’s Office for mediation services.

Court Action:
You may also pursue your claim through the court system. For claims under $7,000, small claims court may be the least costly alternative. Consumer Affairs publishes a Consumer’s Guide to Small Claims Court available upon request. Larger claims may be more suitable to District or Superior Court. You should seek legal advice for all claims.

Other Rights and Remedies

If you do not qualify for a refund under the Lemon Aid Law, other laws and regulations may protect you. Unless otherwise noted, these laws do not apply to private party sales.

Implied Warranty of Merchantability:
In addition to any express written warranties given by the dealer, you are also protected by an Implied Warranty of Merchantability. This implied warranty is automatic with every car sold by a dealer. The dealer warranties that the car is safe and in running condition for at least a reasonable period of time. Consider such factors as the price paid, the car’s age, make, model and mileage to help you determine what problems the dealer should be required to fix.

You cannot waive the implied warranty of merchantability. This means that a dealer cannot sell cars “as is,” “with all faults,” or with a “50/50” warranty.

Odometer Law:
The law prohibits both dealers and private party sellers from turning back or readjusting the odometer or mileage indicator on any automobile offered for sale.

Title Requirements:
All vehicles must have a certificate of title issued by the Registry of Motor Vehicles and must be properly endorsed at the time of sale. The dealer must inform you, on request, of the name and address of the prior owner of a car.

Used Vehicle Warranty Law:
Dealers must provide a written warranty to buyers who purchase a used vehicle with fewer than 125,000 miles at a purchase price of $700 or more. The law requires dealers to repair use or safety defects for either 30, 60, or 90 days, depending on the mileage of the vehicle. It also allows consumers to obtain a refund if during the warranty period they attempted to have the vehicle repaired three times for the same defect, or if the car has been out of service for repairs for at least 11 business days, and the defects still exist.

Private Party Sales:
In addition to the Lemon Aid Law requirements, a private party who sells a consumer a used vehicle must tell the buyer about any known use or safety defects. If the buyer discovers a defect which impairs the safety or substantially impairs the use of the vehicle, and can prove the seller knew about it, then the buyer can return the vehicle within 30 days of purchase. Private parties are bound by this law, regardless of the age or selling price of the vehicle.

Sources of Help

For General Information:
Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation
(617) 973-8787 or Toll Free: (888) 283-3757

Title Information:
Registry of Motor Vehicles
Title Division
(617) 351-9550

To file a complaint against a dealer:
The Office of the Attorney General
(617) 727-8400

Automobile consumers are protected by laws covering those who purchase vehicles in Massachusetts that are found to have significant defects. These free programs offer an additional level of protection for consumers who purchase cars that fail to function as required by law. If you have recently purchased a defective vehicle, follow this simple tool to determine if your vehicle is eligible for Massachusetts’ Lemon Law, Lemon Aid Law, or Used Vehicle Warranty Law.

You must be able to demonstrate that the defects must substantially impair the use, market-value or safety of the vehicle. For example, to prove market value impairment, you must show you vehicle is worth at least 10% less than is would be without the defect.

If the vehicle fails inspection and you’re within seven days

If the vehicle fails inspection, it may be eligible for Lemon Aid, however you must act quickly. Please contact our Office at 888-283-3757 for more information.

Over seven days: The vehicle is not eligible for Massachusetts Lemon Aid Law, but it may be eligible for the Used Vehicle Warranty Law.

Boat Storm Safety Tips

BOAT STORM SAFETY TIPS

As a boat owner, being prepared for hurricane season can save you money … and headaches! We offer the following Travelers’ Boat Storm Safety Tips:

  • If possible, haul the vessel from the water on its own trailer or in collaboration with your marina.
  • If you are unable to check the vessel, have a plan in place to ensure that the vessel can be secured.
  • If the boat remains in the water, remove as much boating gear as possible including electronics and important documents.
  • Double up all lines and check that the lines are long enough to accommodate the expected storm surge. Add chafe gear and extra fenders to prevent damage.
  • If the boat is staying on its mooring, add chafe gear to the anchor rode and if feasible, add additional anchors in a three point position.
  • Reduce wind damage by removing sails, dodgers, dinghies, bridge enclosures and eisenglass.
  • Disconnect shore power cords, water supply hoses and close off any propane or other valves.
  • If possible & prudent, navigate the vessel inland to a secure location away from possible storm surge damage and from boas that could break away from their mooring or slip.
  • Secure and lock all hatches and portlights. Double check for leaks and seal as necessary if a leak is found.
  • Secure all loose gear and any item that may clog scuppers and deck drains.
  • When in doubt “Haul her out.”
  • Never stay aboard during the storm.
  • If the vessel sustains damage from a storm, report the claim in a timely fashion.

Part 5, Optional Bodily Injury to Others

Part 5, Optional Bodily Injury to Others

Coverage Review:  Part 5, Optional Bodily Injury to Others

As your Agent, it’s (just about) the only thing we care about. It’s your Part 5, Optional Bodily to Others coverage!

This is your lawsuit coverage.

We recommend limits of $250,000 per person/$500,000 per accident and a (minimum) $1,000,000 personal liability umbrella coverage.

In addition to coverage, insurance companies provide legal defense.

Do you know how much coverage you have?

Give us a call or a click and let’s review.

 

Umbrella Insurance Part 2

A valued client recently decided to purchase personal liability umbrella insurance coverage.
In general, the amount of coverage you have should at least equal the total of your assets.
The idea being: you’re insurance coverage will protect you from losing the things you’ve worked so hard for. Typically umbrella insurance coverage ranges from $1,000,000 to $5,000,000.
He asked if his retirement accounts could be accessed if sued.
What a great question!
Regarding retirement plans, most plans that fall under ERISA act (Employee Retirement Income Security Act) cannot be touched by a creditor if you’re sued. Most 401k plans fall under ERISA.
IRA’s, on the other hand, are typically not ERISA plans, and can be lost if sued.

Umbrella Insurance

  Umbrella Insurance

Umbrella Insurance protects your assets. If you don’t have an umbrella policy, you should. It’s an important part of one’s financial portfolio.

A Personal Liability Umbrella Policy “sits-over” your home and auto liability limits. Coverage limits start at $1,000,000 and provides you protection from lawsuits.

Coverage is relatively inexpensive to purchase. $1,000,000 of coverage sitting over two autos and a home would cost about $180 annually.

Umbrella Policies require underlying motor vehicle liability limits of $250,000 per person/ $500,000 per accident.

In addition to coverage limits, insurance companies provide legal defense.

So, in essence, when you purchase higher limits you are also purchasing improved legal defense.

Please call or click if you would like to discuss Personal Liability Umbrella Coverage.

Johnson & Rohan InsuranceThank you for insuring with us!

Johnson & Rohan